Tuesday, February 8, 2011

today's 5 minutes

you may recall that a few days ago i tried plaster of paris on canvas. the point behind putting it on a flexible backing is to crack the canvas and take advantage of what that does for texture, how it takes paint, etc.

one would think that mixing 2 parts plaster of paris to one part water is a simple formula, but for some reason i sometimes mess something up & it is a bit too runny. then the plaster flakes. it may also be that i should let it sit for a few days before flexing the backing.


after a day or so, the rest of the plaster seemed pretty well adhered to the canvas and i figured that i would eventually add a lot of gel medium, which will keep it from flaking off, so i started painting. first a very watered down layer of nickel azo ( a wonderful warm color useful for lots of things). one thing i love about plaster is how absorbent it is- the color just soaks in.

here's a close up of the nuances of color created by the paint soaking in differently in various places on the plaster.


today's 5 minutes was a wash of burnt sienna, again well watered down. i dripped left over paint from the top piece onto the bottom. not crazy about the polka dots, so i went back with a spray bottle & toned them down some.


open studios group meeting tonight- hopefully we'll have enough folks to stand for office & to build some committees so we can get started on planning 2011.

tomorrow and thursday evenings- studio time! come back & see what changes!

2 comments:

Judy Wood said...

I have a love/hate relationship with plaster.
One thing that is ringing a distant little warning bell in my head is that at some point the bond between the canvas and the plaster might give way and large chunks of the plaster could fall off--that's where the flex of the canvas is not your friend. I wonder if adding a slug of PVA glue to the mix would help it to stay firmly onto the canvas. I've been reading about using plaster on wood as an encaustic base, and keeping the plaster firmly bonded to the wood is also a bit of an issue. As always, trial and error seems to be the road ahead.

Barb said...

Always trying something new - my head is spinning!